AR Conference Cancellation: What About White Victims of Terrorism?

Christopher Donovan


This weekend was to have been the American Renaissance conference, a fantastic gathering of white advocates from across the Western world.  Its cancellation was forced, as most know by now, because of pressure and terroristic threats received by three (or four?) hotels that were to have hosted.  The anti-white and left-wing elements are gleeful about this development, naturally.

I don’t personally know all the details, and this was actually the first of about four or five conferences in a row that I would have missed (financial reasons, in part).  So I’m casting about in the dark here, but here is what I would like to see.

1.  A thorough investigation by federal law enforcement.  Whether the FBI, the civil rights division at the Department of Justice (criminal or civil sections) or Homeland Security, this entire episode screams out for agents to look into what happened.  Imagine if the NAACP had to cancel a conference because of similar threats.  What would law enforcement’s reaction be?  Swift, fierce and overwhelming.  Law enforcement should set up a sting.  It would be so easy — and bound to catch someone, as the anti-whites are increasingly convinced they’re untouchable.  Yes, most white advocates laugh at the notion that the federal government would ever investigate crimes against us — but don’t be too sure.  Not everyone in federal law enforcement is sitting around itching for the death of the white race, believe me.

2.  Consideration by American Renaissance organizers of civil legal options.  A lawsuit against the hotels, against Fairfax County or D.C. government, against law enforcement, against One People’s Project — whoever else could be named.  Breach of contract, outrageous conduct, prima facie tort, tortious interference, interference with First Amendment rights of assembly and speech, interference with civil rights, emotional distress… you name it, there’s a cause of action, if not a hundred.  Who is this Daryle Jenkins?  Or Jeffrey Imm?  What do these men know about what happened?  Did they encourage illegal activity?  Or civilly tortious activity?  Who are their financial backers, and could those sources be reached?  This option may go nowhere, but it’s worth thinking about.  As a civil defense attorney, I saw the absolute fire-bombing a plaintiff’s attorney could accomplish with nothing but a well-pleaded complaint and discovery.  If you can lay waste to a company because one employee claims sexual harassment — bringing the CEO on down to the cleaning lady in for day-long depositions — imagine what else you could do.

3.  Coverage by the press.  The press hates white advocacy, but they love a juicy story.  “White supremacist conference cancelled” is a juicy story, and there are plenty of people to talk to and comment.  A good reporter should do some digging around.  He (or she) might come up with gold.  If not the NYT, how about the Village Voice?  If there’s no legal recourse here, this must at least be known to the general public, who can usually be expected to say “I don’t agree with those guys, but they should have the right to speak.”  We as white advocates cannot let this incident go undocumented and forgotten, like a modern-day Katyn.  Are you listening out there, journalists?  Jared Taylor will speak to the press, and Lord knows the SPLC will, too.  It’s all packaged up and ready to go… unless, of course, you actually have zero sympathy for white advocates being prevented from meeting, and actively seek to suppress that story because it would present them in too sympathetic a light.  I will be watching, I can assure you.  And I know damn well some of you know about this incident.

4.  Strategizing by white advocates about how to stop this in the future.  This has already been going on, and lots of good ideas have come out, like more-public (i.e., government-run) or private venues.

What’s so depressing about this episode is that it can’t really be called a “wake-up call” for white advocates.  We already know exactly how marginalized we are.  We know exactly what the stiff consequences are for standing up publicly on these issues.  We’ve seen violence against our people.  We’ve seen our people fired from their jobs.  We can’t get paid ads run in publications.  We know CPAC wouldn’t allow us a table.  So, this really is a hard blow.

Could the speakers have their comments recorded and uploaded to the AmRen site for youtube-style viewing?

Christopher Donovan is the pen name of an attorney and former journalist. Email him.

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