Christopher Donovan: The Mohawk Settlement: Some Justice For Whites

Christoper Donovan: At VDare.com, I see that the class action plaintiffs in the Mohawk RICO suit have settled for $18 million.  Attorney Howard Foster’s idea was that by hiring so many illegal aliens, carpet giant Mohawk depressed the wages of American citizens working for the company.  This was a creative legal strategy, a nice victory, and the type of suit that benefits Whites (for the most part — one plaintiff was herself a legal Hispanic).  With a recovery of $250 per worker, the suit was largely symbolic, but it should make big companies think twice about brazen mass hiring of illegals.

In reading the account, I was surprised at what had happened to a Mohawk employee who made complaints while the suit was pending.  Norman Carpenter (not sure if he’s White, but I assume so) went to management about the number of illegal aliens working for the company.  In response, a Hispanic lawyer for the company was dispatched to meet with him — and allegedly threatened him with termination if he kept complaining about illegals.  But Carpenter kept talking, and he was fired.  That turned into a wrongful termination claim, in which Foster sought the deposition of the lawyer, Juan Morillo.  Interestingly, new Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor has let stand a decision that Morillo be deposed (perhaps she angled for the opinion in the hopes that it would cast her in an independent light).

I would be interested to see what happens to Morillo, whose career got a nice boost from networking with co-ethnics and clerking for a Hispanic judge.  No doubt he felt tingly flexing his prestigious legal muscles in defense of his race, but he’s run into a bit of a problem:  the whistleblower laws.

If Hollywood weren’t run by Jews, a character like Morillo would make for a great movie villain:  a self-satisfied minority fat cat whose trajectory screams “affirmative action” and who makes big bucks representing huge companies and bullying work-a-day Whites who toil in carpet factories, only to be brought low by a scrappy attorney who had justice on his side.

Christopher Donovan is the pen name of an attorney and former journalist. Email him.

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