The Southern Point: Bardic Dynamic, Pt. 2

Sir Tristram


Westward the Course of Empire Takes Its Way – Emanuel Leutze

“The study of literature is hero-worship. It is a refinement, or, if you will, a perversion of that primitive religion.”

Ezra Pound, from The Spirit of Romance

The Bardic Dynamic focuses on the magnetic relationship between a speaker and an audience and the communication of a fundamental series of ideas. Traditional examples of this can be found in the great epic poems of Western Civilization. Ezra Pound believed that before about 1750 or so, the quintessence of Western man could only be found in poetry (Pound, 31). The context of these older texts is often an address made by one who remembers to those who may have forgotten. The bard or poet was the “keeper of memories.” This is a very different conception than that which has developed in contemporary times with the hip-hop rapper and his thousand miles a minute ebonicspeak, backed with heavy bass beats or the coffee-house Ginsberg wanna-be railing against, well, against G.I. Joe Whitey, of course. Who else?

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The fashion in which the memories were catalogued provides a glimpse of an oral tradition that outlined communal identity and put forth the ideal of the hero. This “live” speaking has been fundamental to group development in all periods. Attention to the epic form also involves the recognition of a generally accepted scale of values or a web of meanings based upon the recollected experiences of a specific kinfolk. This web of meanings was communicated through a form of charismatic leadership, resting upon the power of a singular, ubiquitous voice that could speak well. The subject matter often involved little more than recounting the key scenes (cinematic moments) from the day’s battles in a compelling manner, in order to facilitate a return into the field the following morning. As time went on, these meditations became more internal and psychological up until the absolute subjectivity of modern poetry and the complete derailment from the connection with the community. This is the error we would try to mend today, thereby reestablishing a more effective continuity between the past and the present as well as between the individual and the group.

Certain extraordinary heroic cycles and turns of phrases gained in popularity through their repetitive retelling, until they reached a grandiose magnitude and became literally, the songs of a people. These songs became reference points and buoys during times of hardship. They represented bulwarks for the spirit as well as catalysts for future heroic action, measuring sticks for those who wanted to test themselves against the greatest examples available. The Odyssey, the Iliad, the Aeneid, the Bible, Beowulf, The Eddas, The Icelandic Sagas, The Divine Comedy, El Cid, The Song of Roland, and L’Morte D’Arthur are all examples in the Western tradition of the relationship between a persuasive speaker and a people at various key turning points in our civilization’s history.

The survival of these vivid heroic testaments is proof of the evolutionary value of the Bardic Dynamic. Science didn’t figure this out. It unraveled some important mysteries, no doubt.  But it also endorsed an unfortunate spiritual shriveling that has inhibited the development of the older and more robust personalities that our forebears displayed so boldly. Fortunately, the seed form of these personalities has been partially been preserved in our poetry and literature in exactly the same way that amber perfectly fossilizes ancient life forms.

Although the United States is still young in the grand scheme of human events and fast heading off a cliff, several American poets have periodically attempted to enunciate an American epic that put forth a heroic vision of our historical experience. These efforts provide us with a starting point of a stand, if nothing else. Realistic beginnings have been made against a backdrop of frontier development and subsequent worldly engagement during the 20th century. According to Jeffrey Walker in his book Bardic Ethos and the American Epic Poem: Whitman, Pound, Crane, Williams, Olson:

Walt Whitman

The poets had taken up the Whitmanesque project for a “great psalm of the republic” that would cultivate a national ethos — or the vital will of what they imagined to be a latent aristocracy, a “true America,” the necessary catalyst for creating a splendid, even world-redeeming national civilization. The ethical cultivation of this vital, aristocratic will required, the modernists believed, the communication of historical intelligence, the moral gist arising from a mythic history that “told the tale” of struggle between the agents of creative will and the anti-vital, torpid, and degenerative counterforces in the common mind. But the bardic poem would not tell that tale, at least not directly. Instead, it would enact the discovery of a sublime historical intelligence and would seek through the dramatic presentation of a bardic voice to involve the reader in that process. (81)

In 1909, when Pound was discovering his Whitmanesque identity, he was also carrying on a correspondence with his mother about … the nature of epic and the role of the American poet. Pound’s examples, in that exchange, were Dante and Whitman, and his definition of epic was “the speech of a nation through the mouth of one man.” Obviously, the definition is debatable, as far as a theory of epic goes, but it is highly revealing as a description of the American bardic voice. (84)

Like Whitman, then, Pound would constitute himself as the elect of the elect, the voodoo aristocrat or shaman-king, and

Ezra Pound

would align himself with ancient powers and ancestral spirits. Their voices, as a nation or a tribe, would emerge from his own mouth. Through the abysmic bard [i.e., he who seeks deep into the abyss of the collective unconscious], Whitman said, many long-dumb voices speak. And, like Whitman, the bardic Pound would speak in the interest of cultural, political, and economic revolution as the decayed aristocracies of the past gave way to the new/old order. The American bard would speak once more with a terrible negative voice, denouncing infidelism where he found it and announcing or promoting a countervision of right conduct and right society. He would promote the ethical will of an ebullient, freely creative “eugenic paganism” — the modern version of Whitman’s “savage virtue.” He would promote also a revitalized society providing that will with scope for its fullest expression. (85)

Pound sought to resurrect an American artifex, a term that connotes something akin to the “Renaissance Man” of modern parlance, a sincere and versatile genius capable of harnessing the diverse components of a civilization together. Odysseus was a classic example of this type from ancient times, with his crafty and brilliant leadership skills. Pound believed that a man like Thomas Jefferson was the epitome of the artifex in North America. Jefferson had an inventive and creative mind. He was more than just an administrator. He was polumetis, a multifaceted statesman who was also an architect and an artist. In Jefferson and/or Mussolini, Pound suggests that Jefferson was the de facto ruler of the United States during the entire generation ensuing Washington’s initial leadership.

Thomas Jefferson

Obviously, that is debatable but the illustration is useful because it suggests that the magnetic power of charismatic leadership might extend beyond the parameters of authorized governing powers (e.g.,. the four-year presidential term). Influence is ultimately related not to positions held but rather to the power of presence.  Pound tried to establish a vivid similarity between the type of leadership that he perceived in Benito Mussolini and his conception of Jefferson’s example. Sidestepping the obvious dissimilarities, he encouraged his audience to view the two as talented political artists and men who were in touch with the “root-and-branch” elements of their respective folk communities.

The artist has been at peace with his oppressors long enough. He has dabbled in democracy and he is now done with that folly. We turn back, we artists, to the powers of the air, to the djinns who were our allies aforetime, to the spirits of our ancestors…The aristocracy of entail and of title is decayed, the aristocracy of commerce is decaying, the aristocracy of the arts is ready again for its service…and we who are the heirs of the witch-doctor and the voodoo, we artists who have been so long the despised are about to take over control.

-Ezra Pound, 1914 (Walker, 84)

Yet Pound ultimately failed in this project. This was partly because he could not connect his “terrible negative voice” to a national audience. If anything, his more polished poetry is aimed at a small circle of fellow poets, revolutionaries, and sacerdotal literati (priestly men of letters outside of the Church). In my opinion, his masterwork, The Cantos, is impossibly obscure, fragmented, and esoteric. Though that doesn’t necessarily nullify its value, he himself was divided over its ultimate utility for posterity. For those with a deep multilingual knowledge of various cultural literary episodes arranged in a bizarre labyrinth of cinematic moments, it may provide considerable insight.  It is still highly regarded in some circles. He even won a Bollingen prize for it, while he was languishing in a mental institution because of his sympathies in World War II.

Pound spent a large amount of his professional life as an expatriate in Europe, extrapolated from that “common mind” in the heartland of America which desperately needed leadership, especially from someone attempting to create a “great psalm of the republic.”  While there is something to be said for distancing art from the bourgeois mentality, it is also possible to become too estranged from one’s people to maintain any sort of decipherable communication. And despite his genuine attempts at preventing American intervention in Europe during World War II, he engaged in the dubious strategy of aligning himself with the Italian fascist regime after the US had decided to go to war and was ultimately labeled a traitor who could only save himself by declaring his insanity. This has effectively cut him off from younger generations who have not been able to resonate with his political choices.

Ezra Pound in his later years

Nevertheless, it is still important to note that Pound is considered to be the preeminent poet of the Modernist movement in the 20th century. His definition of Modernism is summed up in his encouragement to all artists to “Make it new!” His threefold formula for contemporary poetry from his essay “The Art of Poetry” still holds water:

1)      Direct treatment of the ‘thing’ whether subjective or objective

2)      To use absolutely no word that does not contribute to the presentation

3)      As regarding rhythm, to compose in the sequence of the musical phrase, not in sequence of a metronome (Pound, 3).

This “newness” was not aimed at forgetting or destroying the past but rather towards bringing it into the present more effectively. In a review of The H.D. Book by Robert Duncan, Greer Mansfield suggested that,

even though Pound, H.D., and their fellow Modernists were revolting against rhetorically cluttered and metrically anemic “late Romantic” verse, restoring meaning and vigor to poetry by cutting words and drawing with clear and precise lines, they were also conscious inheritors (and refiners) of pre-Raphaelite and Romantic poetry. Pound and H.D. both wrote poems filled with romantic pre-Raphaelite imagery of flowers and trees, longhaired maidens and chivalrous knights. It was imbued with what Pound called ‘the spirit of romance.’

T.S. Eliot dedicated The Wasteland to him, as Pound had been Eliot’s chief editor. He was a close friend of W.B. Yeats. Pound encountered almost every luminous aesthete of his day and virtually all of them were impressed by his erudition and fluidic intelligence.  He advanced many of their careers. He also made many important social comments, especially regarding usury, outside of his poetry, that serve to verify contemporary reactions against the materialism which has fully succeeded in infiltrating and corrupting our intelligentsia today.

Ezra Pound was born in the Hailey, a town in the Idaho frontier territory in 1885. His fiery radio rants in Italy during the War had a folksy, populist tone. Even from the pinnacle of the avant-garde of Modernism, he was unable to fully shed his uncouth and raw American roots which couldn’t help but to ‘tell it l’ak it is.’ Pound explained his understanding of the fascist movement as a struggle to embrace quality over quantity. He said,

The fascist revolution was FOR the preservation of certain liberties and FOR the maintenance of a certain level of culture, certain standards of living, it was NOT a refusal to come down to a level of riches or poverty, but a refusal to surrender certain immaterial prerogatives, a refusal to surrender a great slice of the cultural heritage. (Jeff and/or Muss, Chapter XXXII)

Unsurprisingly, establishment critic Jeffrey Walker is convinced neither by Pound’s example nor his “take” on fascism. He suggests that Pound’s voice is irrelevant because he said unattractive things and he failed to convince a larger group that he was right. His failure, according to Walker, is connected to a charismatic and moral shortcoming. Like many others, he takes Pound to task for his anti-Semitism and instead offers up (in a strange detour if one does not already know how the cultural terrain is mapped) the good Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. (!) as an alternatively successful sacerdotal literatus, who succeeded in altering the national will, where Pound and his fellow elites had failed. (238)

However, Walker winds up with this interesting speculation:

Let us suppose, for a moment, that the poets are right. Their argument is not, after all, wholly without sources of appeal. The mythic history with which they work, not to mention the elemental antithesis of Jefferson and Hamilton (or a sort of populist republicanism versus Federalism, big government, and the banks) is a version of a mainstream political mythology that is still viable today. The poets also have available to them a potent, commonplace notion of personal liberty, as well as a belief in the moral responsibilities of legislators and men of affairs. It is conceivable then, that the literatus could use his mythic history to convince us that the rights of man – conceived in terms of personal liberty within a stable and beautiful social order – could best be served by an enlightened authoritarianism, or by a privileged aristocratic intelligentsia that looks to the artist for its ethical guidance and promotes the enterprise of factive, inventive individuals. It may be possible to demonstrate that the demo-liberal, egalitarian ideals of “anonymous government” or “mobocracy” really are absurdities (as William James suggested) and inconsistent with the lessons of history. It may be true, in short, that the poets preferred authoritarian polity is really most consistent with the high national ambition to create a splendid, world-redeeming civilization equal to, or better than, the greatest civilizations of the past. If the poets could really convince us of the justice and responsibility of their preference, we would unquestionably be driven to a hard choice, one involving a profound redefinition of the national ethos. (239)

Rather than redefining the national ethos, I would assert that the process would be closer to a reminding of something that is already there, namely, the historical and literary experience of the Rest of the West.

Despite his genuflection before gods of political correctness, I do like that Walker entertained the idea that public speakers and statesmen could attain to the sacerdotal literatus status. It offers a novel perspective on energetic populism as a precursor to the higher concept of a leader as prophetic seer and of a bard as a lot more than a court jester.

The Bardic Dynamic is still an unfinished and open-ended project in the United States. I believe that its further evolution will involve the development and emergence of distinctive new voices from a populist soil which will then “blow the top off” through some form of comprehensive nullification at a local yet global level. It will probably look, on the surface, very much like the populism of earlier generations with one primary qualification: conscious White advocacy. If we speak for White people, then we must speak as White people. We’ve never had to qualify it like that before because we assumed either that racial consciousness was a given or that we had to be vague in order to sidestep modern politically correct sensibilities. No longer. Now, it must be taken and secured with a well-tempered righteousness that then assumes a mantle and populist rhetoric that is already in place. Other people do not do things like we do. We cannot speak for them. Nor should we try.

In order to be useful, therefore, this historical intelligence must fundamentally reassert the moral claim of the traditional White people and culture of the United States. The White folk built this country. It is ours, if we act. As Joel Chandler Harris once mused, “I think…that no novel or story can be genuinely American, unless it deals with the common people, that is, the country people (Collier 182).” That goes for the epic, too.

The Bardic Dynamic could be focused on facilitating charismatic leadership by promoting confidence in the traditional people and culture of the West as a substitute for the guilt and groveling that is currently poured in by the MSM. It may also be useful in reestablishing the conduit between a leader and a people. It looks to the communicative popular arts and is trained on heroic endeavor and example as recorded by our writers, storytellers, artists and public speakers, rather than scholarly abstractions that flee to the citadel of a scholastic environment, a Parisian salon, or a downtown high rise. It seeks a soapbox and a town square, or a good bonfire. Most of all, it seeks fellows of a like mind.

Robert Penn Warren Commemorative Stamp, 2005

You ask me what my program is. Here it is, you hicks. And don’t you forget it. Crucify ‘em! Crucify Joe Harrison. Crucify anybody who stands in your way. Crucify MacMurfee if he don’t deliver. Crucify anybody who stands in your way. You hand me the hammer and the ten-penny and I’ll do it with my own hand. Crucify ‘em on the barn door! And don’t fan away the blue-bottles with any turkey wing!

Robert Penn Warren, All the King’s Men, 134

Charismatic leadership depends on resonance. Resonance in the US depends on understanding the predominant features of the common American White character and in relaying that understanding effectively. For examples on the political front, we would do well to reexamine American populists, especially figures like Huey Long and George Wallace, who, for a time, harnessed the “voice of a people” in response to the Eastern Establishment’s destructive incursions into their communities. They were extraordinarily talented, spontaneous public speakers. Popular prejudice short circuits considerations of these southerners, but see how charismatic and “on point” they are here, here, here, here, and here.

We desperately need leaders like them now.

Life Cover from August 2, 1968

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18 Comments to "The Southern Point: Bardic Dynamic, Pt. 2"

  1. Joe Webb's Gravatar Joe Webb
    October 2, 2011 - 2:14 pm | Permalink

    speaking of aspiring to ancestral beauty, when I got to college about 1960, despite my leftist family background and generic red sensibility, when I discovered Ancient Greece I longed for it. I studied political science instead, but noted my predilections.

    To give the devil its due, the Left has aspired to Beauty of some kind, impossible as we know it is, yet the Left has also refused Money, and has its heroic Myth. and has built its Myth from White Aspiration to make the whole world White ( standards of fairness, etc). That is until recently when it discovered that Whiteness includes dominating dummies.

    So, now the Left Aspiration is to Refuse Beauty, which is always White (almost), and Luv the racial refuse…give us your tired , your poor, your ugly deformed, your hopelessly retarded and generally wretched. Jews of course played a large part in this. But it is our White politeness, and liberality of spirit aspiring to be kind that is responsible for this.

    The ancient beauty was not particularly kind. I suppose the passing of the aristocratic order in which strong men instructed, and killed the levelers, that allowed the eternal feminine Luv of women and wymyn-men to keep their deformed alive. Pets, if you will, not Men and Women.
    A terrible beauty will reassert itself. That is the struggle to come, which will make the 20th century look like a mere sketch for a larger project.
    J

  2. Sir Tristram's Gravatar Sir Tristram
    September 30, 2011 - 12:55 pm | Permalink

    @lojack: Hmmm…methinks you weren’t aware beforehand that Davidson addressed it in Attack on Leviathan as you would’ve at least been able to reason how I could have made the mistake, which you did not.

    And, to be more exact, Davidson quotes it and he also reframes it. I’m not sure why you would go to some length to polarize the differences between Davidson and Russell negatively as you did because the direction of your critique tends to derail the point that I made by asserting that Davidson and Russell are irreconcilable. The point is simply that there are two vital dynamics respectively represented by Science and Poetry, that must not be confused. They certainly agreed on that. Like I said before, the reference was an honest mistake. I’ve carried that line in my head for years as I came to it through Davidson’s text. It is applicable specifically to his development of the conflict between the Irresistible Forces and Immovable Bodies, which, in my opinion, is an extremely useful construction. He certainly admired The Interpreters and preferred Russell’s vision to Wells, though they may’ve had differences elsewhere, of which I am not fully cognizant.

    I would argue, however, that he goes in a bit of a different direction with the theme when seen against the backdrop of his own life example and the unique variable of the American historical experience. If I had to write the line over again, it would probably go more like this:

    “The Bardic Dynamic, on the contrary, is perhaps best summed up by AE’s comment that “All that is substance in us aspires to the ancestral beauty (Attack, 366).” I would do it this way because, on the whole, I am not familiar with Russell’s work. I know it through Davidson’s lens and it is important to me for the light it sheds on his example and its relevance to a genuine precursor to an American white nationalism or regionalism which is able to fully assume the mantle of the Bardic Dynamic, which I will develop in more detail later on, with adequate citation.

    This is the quote as it actually appears in Attack on Leviathan, which I finally managed to rustle up, with some very useful “reframing” voila Davidson, for those who are interested in the discussion:

    “The poet Lavelle is ruled by the earth spirit. Like a true Celtic mystic, he believes in intuitive communion with nature and the gods of nature. He is a nationalist – or perhaps he is a regionalist – who holds that the earth-spirit makes for diversity of life. Every race has its own culture, and the races or nations follow “archetypal images.” It is tyranny, or indeed sacrilege, to violate the resulting unity, or “orchestration of race,” by imposition from without (Attack, 360).

    …Lavelle the poet argues for the integrity of national cultures. “How,” he says, “could national genius create a civilization if an alien power controls the economic and cultural activities of the people, if it substitutes in youth a mongrel culture for the national culture.” The national culture is not necessarily superior to the alien culture because the latter is alien. But “national aptitudes are not interchangeable…We can draw inspiration from other races, but their culture can never be a substitute for our own…If all wisdom was acquired from without it might be politic to make our culture cosmopolitan. But I believe our best wisdom does not come from without, but arises in the soul and is an emanation from the earth-spirit, a voice speaking directly to us as dwellers in the land.

    Lavelle goes on to condemn “rootless” cultures and to explain what he means by “mongrel” cultures. “In countries where they have lost the primeval consciousness of unity with the earth spirit they either have no mythology and cosmogony an thought is materialistic, or else they go to the Greek or the Jew for spiritual culture. So distant lands are made sacred, but not the air they breathe, not the earth under foot. A culture so created has rarely deep roots, for it is derivative (362).”

    To Heyt, the advocate of the World State, such ideas are juvenile, romantic, backward. He is a realist and believes in power. “The might of an organism is the measure of its rightness…The upholding of a regional ideal is like the display of a ruined house. The weakness of the regional ideal is enough to condemn it for him. Power is where it belongs, in the hands of the World State, which is ruled by pragmatic minds that can organize control (362-3).

    …”‘All that is substance in us aspires to the ancestral beauty’ – that is the category of matter, or earth, in which the poet moves. “All that is power in us desires to become invincible” – that is the category of Heyt, the man of the World State (366).”

    …”Those who seek for beauty will never master its magic unless they also have power, and those who seek for power will find that the mighty surrenders itself fully only to that which is most gentle (366).”

    In the end, we have a balance between these two dynamics. As things currently stand, however, it is the Bardic Dynamic which needs amplification for this balance to be achieved. That’s pretty much the direction of my rhetoric in these articles.

  3. Sir Tristram's Gravatar Sir Tristram
    September 30, 2011 - 12:27 pm | Permalink

    @lojack: Hmmm…methinks you weren’t aware beforehand that Davidson addressed it in Attack on Leviathan as you would’ve at least been able to reason how I could have made the mistake, which you did not.

    And, to be more exact, Davidson quotes it and he also reframes it. I’m not sure why you would go to some length to polarize the differences between Davidson and Russell negatively as you did because the direction of your critique tends to derail the point that I made by asserting that Davidson and Russell are irreconcilable. The point is simply that there are two vital dynamics respectively represented by Science and Poetry, that must not be confused. They certainly agreed on that. Like I said before, the reference was an honest mistake. I’ve carried that line in my head for years as I came to it through Davidson’s text. It is applicable specifically to his development of the conflict between the Irresistible Forces and Immovable Bodies, which, in my opinion, is an extremely useful construction. He certainly admired The Interpreters and preferred Russell’s vision to Wells, though they may’ve had differences elsewhere, of which I am not fully cognizant.

    I would argue, however, that he goes in a bit of a different direction with the theme when seen against the backdrop of his own life example and the unique variable of the American historical experience. If I had to write the line over again, it would probably go more like this:

    “The Bardic Dynamic, on the contrary, is perhaps best summed up by AE’s comment that “All that is substance in us aspires to the ancestral beauty (Attack, 366).” I would do it this way because, on the whole, I am not familiar with Russell’s work. I know it through Davidson’s lens and it is important to me for the light it sheds on his example and its relevance to a genuine precursor to an American white nationalism or regionalism which is able to fully assume the mantle of the Bardic Dynamic, which I will develop in more detail later on, with adequate citation.

    This is the quote as it actually appears in Attack on Leviathan, which I finally managed to rustle up, with some very useful “reframing” voila Davidson, for those who are interested in the discussion:

    “The poet Lavelle is ruled by the earth spirit. Like a true Celtic mystic, he believes in intuitive communion with nature and the gods of nature. He is a nationalist – or perhaps he is a regionalist – who holds that the earth-spirit makes for diversity of life. Every race has its own culture, and the races or nations follow “archetypal images.” It is tyranny, or indeed sacrilege, to violate the resulting unity, or “orchestration of race,” by imposition from without (Attack, 360).

    …Lavelle the poet argues for the integrity of national cultures. “How,” he says, “could national genius create a civilization if an alien power controls the economic and cultural activities of the people, if it substitutes in youth a mongrel culture for the national culture.” The national culture is not necessarily superior to the alien culture because the latter is alien. But “national aptitudes are not interchangeable…We can draw inspiration from other races, but their culture can never be a substitute for our own…If all wisdom was acquired from without it might be politic to make our culture cosmopolitan. But I believe our best wisdom does not come from without, but arises in the soul and is an emanation from the earth-spirit, a voice speaking directly to us as dwellers in the land.

    Lavelle goes on to condemn “rootless” cultures and to explain what he means by “mongrel” cultures. “In countries where they have lost the primeval consciousness of unity with the earth spirit they either have no mythology and cosmogony an thought is materialistic, or else they go to the Greek or the Jew for spiritual culture. So distant lands are made sacred, but not the air they breathe, not the earth under foot. A culture so created has rarely deep roots, for it is derivative (362).”

    To Heyt, the advocate of the World State, such ideas are juvenile, romantic, backward. He is a realist and believes in power. “The might of an organism is the measure of its rightness…The upholding of a regional ideal is like the display of a ruined house. The weakness of the regional ideal is enough to condemn it for him. Power is where it belongs, in the hands of the World State, which is ruled by pragmatic minds that can organize control (362-3).

    …”‘All that is substance in us aspires to the ancestral beauty’ – that is the category of matter, or earth, in which the poet moves. “All that is power in us desires to become invincible” – that is the category of Heyt, the man of the World State (366).”

    …”Those who seek for beauty will never master its magic unless they also have power, and those who seek for power will find that they mighty surrenders itself fully only to that which surrenders itself fully only to that which is most gentle (366).”

    In the end, we have a balance between these two dynamics. As things currently stand, however, it is the Bardic Dynamic which needs amplification for this balance to be achieved. That’s pretty much the direction of my rhetoric in these articles.

  4. Hard Shell Baptist's Gravatar Hard Shell Baptist
    September 29, 2011 - 5:01 pm | Permalink

    The essential Davidson is found in his Southern Writers in the Modern World, the printed lectures he gave at then-segregated Mercer University in Macon, Ga, in 1957.

    Today, you can’t avoid the negroids all over campus. They are some of the most sullen, ugly, hideous Ns you’ll find anywhere. If you hold the door for them, they walk through and don’t even acknowledge you. Why should they thank you for sharing some of your chivalry, otherwise called White Privilege. You owe it to them anyway, and they are justifiably enraged that you didn’t do more sooner.

    Macon’s White Community is very conservative, unless they are associated with the Episcopal Church and the colleges. The Willet Chapel at Mercer University where he gave the lectures now houses the offices of Women’s and Gender Studies and African American Studies.

    Macon is continuing to suffer from a growing African American gang violence problem. Robberies and murders are almost daily. Nobody can solve it. They even invited the gang leaders to talk on the radio. They said it was jess duh neighborhood thang. At least the Africanisms are killing each other, for now.

    The rich Whiteys in North Macon send their kids to the private White Flight academies, and now even those have surrendered to the Diversity Mandate. “We just can’t properly educate our White Privileged Darlings unless we teach them how to Embrace Diversity and Inclusion while they are Celebrating Diversity and Differences. After all, the White Majority College Admissions Offices all want to see an immersion in Diversity in high school, so we just much catch up with the times. Surely these blacks don’t really carry all the diseases that the racist CDC says they do. Our children won’t catch anything nasty from the toilet seat or water fountain.”

    Sadly, the types of Africanisms that get into the private schools aren’t the kind we can call “authentic” Diversity. They don’t speak ebonics.

    Next time you are there, drive by the tennis courts and swimming pool at Idle Hour Country Club (Fortress Idle Hour) where the Macon Whitey Privileged Elites keep themselves out of the gunfire. Even there, you will see Integration Run Amok. A few blacks playing tennis, and blacks swimming in the pools with some of the hottest looking, best bred, most nobly born White Girls in the South.

    Nothing stays pure. Everything is turning into ghetto. The only recourse for WNRRs is to withdraw completely and give nothing to any organization that ever would allow Diversity to get near White Children. Which pretty much means you can’t safely give anything to anybody these days. Even the Tea Party is diseased with Diversity Mania.

  5. lojack's Gravatar lojack
    September 29, 2011 - 4:41 pm | Permalink

    Sir Tristam,

    Davidson didn’t reframe the quotation- he stated it exactly as was written in Interpreters.

  6. lojack's Gravatar lojack
    September 29, 2011 - 4:37 pm | Permalink

    spell it

    Davidson does thoroughly attribute A.E.’s Interpreters in his essay, which in its fullness is a comparison of A.G. Well’s Shape of Things to Come with Interpreters. But to keep the quotation as attributed to Davidson in Part I is an injustice to him and A.E.

    ” The Bardic Dynamic, on the contrary, is perhaps best summed up by Donald Davidson’s statement that “All that is substance in us longs for the ancestral beauty.” ”

    could very easily be corrected to

    ” The Bardic Dynamic, on the contrary, is perhaps best summed up the historian Brehon in A.E.’s Interpreters: “All that is substance in us longs for the ancestral beauty,” a work that Donald Davidson admired in his vital Attack on the Leviathan. ”

    In our striving, we must not lose accuracy.

    But as a reward for reading this comment, I’ll share with you all that the Univ. of Georgia has given a Diversity scholarship to a black girl named “Negga”. Really.

  7. lojack's Gravatar lojack
    September 29, 2011 - 4:36 pm | Permalink

    Davidson does thoroughly attribute A.E.’s Interpreters in his essay, which in its fullness is a comparison of A.G. Well’s Shape of Things to Come with Interpreters. But to keep the quotation as attributed to Davidson in Part I is an injustice to him and A.E.

    ” The Bardic Dynamic, on the contrary, is perhaps best summed up by Donald Davidson’s statement that “All that is substance in us longs for the ancestral beauty.” ”

    could very easily be corrected to

    ” The Bardic Dynamic, on the contrary, is perhaps best summed up the historian Brehon in A.E.’s Interpreters: “All that is substance in us longs for the ancestral beauty,” a work that Donald Davidson admired in his vital Attack on the Leviathan. ”

    In our striving, we must not lose accuracy.

    But as a reward for reading this comment, I’ll share with you all that the Univ. of Georgia has given a Diversity scholarship to a black girl named “Negga”. Really.

  8. Sir Tristram's Gravatar Sir Tristram
    September 29, 2011 - 11:35 am | Permalink

    @lojack: Well, you haven’t studied Davidson very closely. I’ve already answered this criticism elsewhere. Davidson reframes George Russell’s language from The Interpreters in Chapter 17 of Attack on Leviathan, “The Shape of Things and Men.” If you had read this all important chapter, you would know where I was coming from and wouldn’t have dismissed the sentence so curtly. I wouldn’t have made the assertion had I not read it there. I have already conceded the point to another that perhaps I should’ve annotated it more properly. I do not presently have my hands on the book and am operating from some old notes and paraphrased comments. After rechecking these, I saw that indeed, Davidson does credit George Russell with the statement.

    However, the source is correct here for the particular recalibration that Davidson’s analysis provides. He was using the line to further clarify the preferred technique of the Immovable Body. He elaborates by utilizing Russell’s language to polarize a conflict between the poets and the men of the modern power state as representatives of the Immovable Bodies and Irresistible Forces in the American experiment. The quote is actually, “All that is substance in us aspires to the ancestral beauty.” Davidson argues that this is the way of the POET. The MEN OF THE MODERN POWER STATE, on the contrary, say “All that is power in us desires to become invincible.” This is an interpretation that is pure Donald Davidson and is an original contribution. It then reminded me of the passage in Understanding Poetry where Warren quotes Bertrand Russell, regarding “power knowledge.” Now, Warren does not give a specific annotation for Bertrand Russell’s rhetoric because at a certain point, annotation becomes superfluous and tedious, especially when one is aiming at something higher.

    To some degree, everyone harbors elements of both the Immovable Bodies and Irresistible Forces. However, Davidson gives a philosophic position from which we can counter the onslaught of the Eastern Establishment and its endorsement of everything that dissolves Western man. It’s like a cultural game of paper, rock, and scissors. You can’t fight scissors with paper. You will get cut down every time. You have to have the rock. That’s the sense of the language used.

  9. Tom's Gravatar Tom
    September 29, 2011 - 10:58 am | Permalink

    Ezra Pound was a promoter of Modern Art, and the literary voice of Vorticism.
    http://www.vorticism.co.uk/home.html

    Pound, also wrote a published “Manifesto” for the English style of cubism-futurism known as Vorticism.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vorticism

  10. Connor Dirk's Gravatar Connor Dirk
    September 28, 2011 - 11:22 pm | Permalink

    @Trenchant: Following through on a comment addressed to me under Part 1, let me thank you for the link. The Walter Block anatomy of the Jewish Left made interesting reading. As he concludes, the origin and progress of the disease remains puzzling despite many conspicuous markers. The great age and turbulent history of Judaism have been ample enough to create many mysteries and anomalies. As troublesome as these people are, the fact that this culture is still with us after so great a period of time, persisting through so many vicisitudes, creates a fascination that is irresistible. The proliferation of variant sects, spread across innumerable countries, makes the matter mind-boggling. Seemingly, they have survived by making themselves invisible, so to speak – a strange and disarming idea. Parasitism and protective coloring.

    You know, it is well known that they have traditionally guarded details of their culture…in this attitude demurring from bonafide participation in Census. So far as this country is concerned, with a Zionist occupied government, I have never accepted the published count as reliable or in any way approaching true numbers. If they lie about everything else, why would this detail not also be a lie? My guess is, the Jewish demographic has never been accurately represented. Likely they are here in far great number than believed.

    Concerning your above comment, one of the most common charges brought against Jewry is that their practices play upon the basest human extincts. Usury is a glaring example of this. Proof lies in the fact that usury is considered so predatory that it is not practiced within the ethnic group, itself. It could be expected that individuals in financial straits might be vulnerable to excessively high interest rates to alleviate their need. This is exploitative and merciless.

    Also, I suspect that Jews borrowing money from Jewish bankers pay no interest at all, or little. This creates an unlevel playing field which accounts for the easy dominance Jews achieve in any field they enter.

    Yes, fractional banking was invented by wizards of greed and iniquity. The entire Federal Reserve has to be nationalized and its assets confiscated. It is unacceptable that a great republic should be borrowing money for its operations. That Congress has allowed this thing to perpetuate itself for a hundred years now is the most striking proof available of the pack of felons and brigands we have at the U.S. Capitol. It simply defies belief. The task before us is staggering.

  11. Connor Dirk's Gravatar Connor Dirk
    September 28, 2011 - 9:21 pm | Permalink

    @lojack: This is the second time we’ve seen you strain at a gnat and bolt a camel. Sir Tristram’s work is such a splendid contribution to this website, and to internet intellectual life in general, it’s hard to believe you could overlook such an outstanding contribution and rush on to denigrate the author over a relatively small detail. Personally, I cannot vouch for the source of the quote, but considering your rudeness, and general lack of light, I would be inclined to place my trust in the elegant and insightful Sir Tristram.

    We also recall your suggestion that the author adopt as his model another writer familiar to us. That presumption, alone, defines your judgment as skewed and irrelevant. I can’t recall an essay characterized by more brilliance, daring, on-the-mark analysis, and wise counsel. Sir Tristram’s work, thankfully, arises in response to a national – nay, international – crisis of ethnic conflict. The world has never been poised at so perilous a juncture; nor have we been so bereft of sages who read the lay of the land, are willing to rouse themselves to the cause of our endangerment, and signify the pathway out of darkness.

    Sir Tristram, your articles are a Godsend, and reflect so much perspicacity and beauty of spirit we will always be in your debt. Part 2 is a fitting sequel to the initial offering and, I think, portends the best possible riposte to the savage incursions of Judaism. What better way to rouse from its complacency a drowsing ruling class than by reawakening in them a sense of the sweep and inspiration of their New World saga?

    Thank you, fellow traveler. Thank you.

  12. lojack's Gravatar lojack
    September 28, 2011 - 8:17 pm | Permalink

    The Bardic Dynamic, on the contrary, is perhaps best summed up by Donald Davidson’s statement that “All that is substance in us longs for the ancestral beauty.”

    That was from your Part I. The quotation isn’t Davidson. It is from theosophist A.E.’s The Interpreters, 1922. He was a universalist mystic, much in contrast with Davidson.

    Please correct the error.

    Davidson was anything but a universalist. He was a particularist of the most extreme type, and therefore a good example for us, as that’s what we are. A.E. was an Irish Nationalist, but he wrapped it in too much universal brotherhood, which is ultimately dissatisfying for the volk.

  13. Michael Hoffman's Gravatar Michael Hoffman
    September 28, 2011 - 5:55 pm | Permalink

    We have reprinted Ezra Pound’s book, “Jefferson and/or Mussolini.”

    Details are here:
    HYPERLINK

    Sincerely,
    Michael Hoffman

  14. Franklin Ryckaert's Gravatar Franklin Ryckaert
    September 28, 2011 - 8:23 am | Permalink

    @Rehmat:
    Mr.Off-Topic,all true about islamic calligraphy but what has that to do with the “Southern Point”?

  15. Franklin Ryckaert's Gravatar Franklin Ryckaert
    September 28, 2011 - 8:20 am | Permalink

    @Rehmat:

  16. Rehmat's Gravatar Rehmat
    September 28, 2011 - 7:39 am | Permalink

    Arabic calligraphy has always been the supreme art form of the Islamic world. From the very begining of the Islamic faith – Arabic calligraphy has expressed and enhanced the aesthetic and spiritual dimensions of Islam in the shape of Qur’anic calligraphy. Not only that – it also played a major role in the other Islamic arts, such as, architecture, metalwork, ceramics, glass and textiles – draw on calligraphy as their principal source of embellishment. With the spread of Islam – Arabic calligraphy first spread to Iraq, Syria, Palestine and Egypt and later to North Africa, Spain, Sicily and in the east to Iran, Central Asia, China, India, Afghanistan, the Philippines, Indonesia, Malaysia and Burma…….

    http://rehmat1.wordpress.com/2010/03/21/islamic-calligraphy/

  17. Jason Speaks's Gravatar Jason Speaks
    September 28, 2011 - 4:30 am | Permalink

    Very interesting article. You know, George Wallace is someone who had gone down the memory hole for the most part, yet he actually won 5 states in his 1968 Presidential bid as a third party, which is an amazing accomplishment.

  18. Trenchant's Gravatar Trenchant
    September 28, 2011 - 12:51 am | Permalink

    The Parable of the Talents, as I read it, condones lending at interest. I can see nothing wrong with a contractual arrangement at whatever rate both parties agree on.

    On the other hand, I do have problems with interest-bearing loans created ex nihilo by dint of the fractionally-reserved banking cartel.

Comments are closed.