Category Archives: Western Culture

Wagner Reclaimed: A Review of “The Ring of Truth” by Roger Scruton, Part 2

Go to Part 1. “Sarcasm and satire run riot on the stage” Productions of The Ring in the modern era have invariably sought to satirize the drama to subvert the message Wagner attempts to convey. Scruton observes that, notwithstanding the increasingly tiresome preoccupation with dissecting the tetralogy for anti-Jewish and proto-fascistic themes and images (and […]

Wagner Reclaimed: A Review of “The Ring of Truth” by Roger Scruton, Part 1

Roger Scruton is Britain’s (many would say the world’s) leading conservative philosopher and intellectual. His prolific output includes books on philosophy, politics, art, architecture, music and aesthetics. Scruton, who was knighted in 2016, writes with unusual clarity and fluency and is a model for how to combine analytical rigor with lucidity and accessibility. His critiques […]

The Laws: Plato’s Sacred Ethnostate, Part 4: Greek Unity and the Federation against Barbarians

Go to Part 1 Go to Part 2 Go to Part 3 Greek Unity: Federation against Barbarians Beyond the family and city-state, the third concentric circle of kinship and loyalty is that of the league of cities or indeed the Greek nation itself. In the Republic, Plato had argued that Greeks should be gentle with […]

The Laws: Plato’s Sacred Ethnostate, Part 2: Social Cohesion and Just Inegalitarianism

Go to Part 1. A Holistic Rule of Law Aiming at Inculcating Virtue and Social Cohesion Plato’s main innovation in the Laws is to have pioneered the notion of the “rule of law.” He constrains the Magnesian regime in a complex system of laws and courts of appeal, guaranteed by the so-called Guardians of the […]

The Laws: Plato’s Sacred Ethnostate, Part 1

A version of this article will appear as a chapter in an upcoming book on ethnopolitical thought in ancient Greece. Constructive criticisms and comments are therefore most welcome. Plato’s Republic is one of the most famous books in existence. So long as it has had readers, people have wondered whether the ideal state presented in […]

Adaptive Barbarism: Politics and Kinship in the Iliad, Part 1

The following article will appear as a chapter in an upcoming book on ethnopolitical thought in ancient Greece. Constructive criticisms and comments are therefore most welcome. We know that every organism and every species is engaged in a ceaseless struggle for survival and reproduction. This is equally true of peoples: throughout history, those with the […]

The Roman Variant of Indo-European Social Organization: Militarization, Aristocratic Government, and Openness to Conquered Peoples. Part 2

Part 1 here. The Openness of Roman Society: Social Mobility and Incorporating Different Peoples Indo-European social structure was based on talent and ability.[1] Upward mobility was possible, and I-E groups in Europe tended to have only weak, permeable barriers between conquerors and conquered peoples — barriers that could be breached by the talented. This was […]