Learning from Baseball

There are lessons to be learned from the game of baseball.

A big one is around race.  In this area, baseball operates on the principles of equal opportunity and merit.  Everybody, no matter their race, gets an equal chance to play, let’s say, shortstop for the Yankees, and the person who can play shortstop the best gets the position.  No trying to make up for injustices in the past, no affirmative action, no racial quotas, no idea of adequate competence being the criterion of measure for getting the job.   You have the same shot at playing shortstop as everybody else, and if you can do it better than anyone trying out, you get it.

As a practical matter, minorities (at least minority in the U.S.—non-whites are ninety percent of the world’s population) have flourished under this arrangement.  I checked last night’s Yankee’s lineup, and of the ten starters—the eight position players, the pitcher, and the designated hitter—seven, including the shortstop, were minorities.   They are truly excellent, they deserve to be there, and no one is complaining about their right to be in those slots.  Compare that outcome with those in any area of society which operates under another arrangement than equal opportunity and no-exceptions merit—schooling, the workplace, grants and contracts, or the arts.

People tend to rise to the level of expectation.  If they know they have an equal chance at something and that no one is going to cut them any slack, they’ll do their best at it and succeed on their merits.  Everyone will get the benefits of their contributions and they’ll feel good about themselves and earn the respect of others.  If they don’t make the grade, they’ll get into some other endeavor where they can achieve results without somebody doing them a favor.   Whites don’t whine about not being in the National Basketball Association (last night, the Boston Celtics didn’t have a white player on its twelve-man game roster) and insist on preferential treatment for themselves at the expense of black players; they play games, broadly defined, where they can compete successfully.

Recently, I took other lessons from baseball.

Another Yankee example: a Yankee player slid hard, spikes high, into the lower leg of the Red Sox second baseman.  The second baseman could have been badly hurt; luckily, he wasn’t.  Right away, the Red Sox second baseman let the Yankee player know in no uncertain terms that he didn’t appreciate what had just happened.

 

(Boston MA, 04/11/18) Boston Red Sox second baseman Brock Holt tags out New York Yankees first baseman Tyler Austin during the first inning of the MLB game at Fenway Park on Wednesday, April 11, 2018. Staff photo by Matt Stone

Lesson number one:  Speak up.   Let people know when you are getting messed over, including—the area of this publication’s concern—getting the short end of the stick because you are white.

Later in the game, the Yankee player was up to bat and the Red Sox pitcher drilled him with a 98-mile-an-hour fastball.

Lesson number two:  Make a negative consequence follow for the person or persons messing you over.

Objecting to being hit by the pitch, the Yankee player rushed the mound to attack the Red Sox pitcher.   At the last second, the Red Sox pitcher glided a bit to the side like a matador and countered with a few good punches on the Yankee player.

(Boston MA, 04/11/18) Boston Red Sox relief pitcher Joe Kelly fights with New York Yankees first baseman Tyler Austin after hitting him with a pitch along with catcher Christian Vazquez and first baseman Mitch Moreland during the seventh inning of the MLB game at Fenway Park on Wednesday, April 11, 2018. Staff photo by Matt Stone

Lesson number three:  If they try to get back at you for imposing a negative consequence, evade or block—or absorb, so be it—their attack and impose a second negative consequence.

The media didn’t like what the Red Sox did one bit.  Their retaliation reflected a culture of masculinity that elites want to eradicate.   We have to rid the game of “beanballs,” they moralized.  Actually, it wasn’t a beanball; beanballs are pitches thrown at batters’ heads.  This fastball was thrown at the batter’s torso, striking him in the elbow.  It was measured action, not all-out.   Double-ouch, swollen the next few days I understand, but not a beanball.   Baseball has to purge itself of retaliation, so the outsiders pontificated.  How unenlightened, the game has to catch up with the times, etc., etc.

Screw the media.  I don’t care if he plays another fifteen years, I’ll bet that Yankee player never spikes another second baseman.   Baseball players cut through the speechifying and sermonizing from their “betters” and come to grips with reality.  A central part of that, they take shit from nobody.  Let’s hope it doesn’t have to take the form of a physical response like in baseball, but whether it’s around race or whatever else, you and I could be the same way.

14 replies
  1. Colin Jeffers
    Colin Jeffers says:

    Baseball isn’t exactly as fair as the author contends. In point of fact Whites are routinely passed over in the minors in favor of non-whites. Steve Sailer of all people wrote about this many years ago after crunching the numbers and it’s only gotten worse. Then there is the unspoken problem of drug use (PEDs like steroids, human growth hormone etc.) which many people feel is only selectively enforced, meaning most of the time (these days) the non-whites are getting a pass, a wink and a nod on many occasions while the Whites have to be clean or at least better at getting past the tests. This is a huge problem in track and field, the NFL and other sports, but that’s beyond the scope of this post. Otherwise, this was an interesting piece.

    • Curmudgeon
      Curmudgeon says:

      The panic started in 2005, when the White Sox and Astros met in the World Series. The White Sox fielded a starting nine that was all White, and had very few Blacks.
      https://www.gettyimages.ca/event/seattle-mariners-v-chicago-white-sox-52267382#the-2005-chicago-white-sox-pose-for-a-team-photo-at-us-cellular-field-picture-id53437245

      The Astros were, by today’s standards a “White” team as well. I recall the TV announcers whining about the lack of Blacks on the Sox, and how something had to be done to encourage more Blacks to baseball.

      • Charlie
        Charlie says:

        Blacks are a race of recreation and self-gratification, not work. They once sought out baseball as a means of wealth and accessing White women for fornication. They no longer went that direction and now head for the more violent sports that match their aptitude and penchant for violence such as the NFL and NBA. Also, sports where they’re able to hog the ball and not play as a team member, also matching their personas of “all about themselves”. Whites play sports generally from a team perspective. Blacks do not.

        All in all the MLB, NFL and other black sports are dying. Whites have reached their fill of public subsidizing corporate sports teams where the outcome means nothing and are too expensive to enjoy at a family level. Sure, there will continue to be the White Man Child/Doug Heffernan types that will always cheer on the negro but most Whites are now turning away.

  2. Sidney secular
    Sidney secular says:

    Another thing to be learned about baseball is the relative unimportance of the time it takes to play the game. Unlike many sports, the clock is not usually a factor in the outcome. There are no quarters or periods or overall lengths of time to contend with when playing the game as in football or basketball. Batters and pitchers can take whatever time they need to execute their plays. This approach gives the game a likeness to chess where moves can take really long lengths of time to execute. Managers treat the game like chess with complex strategies and counter-strategies considered. Fans can relax and enjoy considering the drawn out affairs and the time taken to execute crucial plays can be drawn out with multiple pitching changes made and suspense is thereby given time build up as the action slows.

    • Charlie
      Charlie says:

      “Small Ball” is dead. Managers are encouraged to have the power hitter instead of a “team sport” where all players factor in and you see the tension from bunting, base stealing, sacrifice flies, etc. A group of unintelligible Hispanics muttering “an the nes dae an the nes dae…..”

  3. Ian
    Ian says:

    Non-whites in sports are usually picked for economic reasons. This is very common in European football (soccer) where there are lots of Africans. Teams like Manchester United (owned by the very Jewish Glazer family) often recruit African and black players to cut down on the wage bill.

    This blocks white talent. You just have to look at the “French” team. In contrast the Spanish national football team won the FIFA World Cup in 2010 without ethnic diversity. The Spanish also often do well at basketball despite lacking Africans.

  4. Lorenz Kraus
    Lorenz Kraus says:

    Pro-Baseball is a masonic game that runs on the fraud of Jews and secret societies.

    http://www.gematrinator.com/calculator/classic/index.php

    In Gematria, nigger = 42 and Jackie Robinson was given the number name 42. A big laugh for those in the know. Freemason Michael Richards barked nigger at his comedy show and then begged for forgiveness, modeling the lunatic white who goes off the handle and then submits to his overlords. Behavior modeling is very powerful. This is what these hoaxes are all about. Terrorist attack? Don’t over-react goy.

    http://freetofindtruth.blogspot.com/search?q=jackie+robinson

    Baseball is rigged to the nines. BASEBALL = 162 and there are 162 games.

    Blowing the doors off the fraud of Jew-run pro-sports is vital because it hits the Jews in the wallet. If the public is buying cable games on the assumption the games are real, not rigged, then there is fraud on a huge scale. Plus, these rigged games are spectacles that relate to other news events. If pro-sports is taken down, fake news goes with it.

    Here are the basics of Skull and Bones: there are 206 bones in the body. Zeroes are dropped, so you get 26. There are 33 vertebrae in the spine. The Bible monster ripped out a rib from Adam, leaving 11 ribs on one side. There are 32 teeth in the adult mouth.

    Heather for Hire played dead at age 32. The Vegas Shooter shot from the 32 floor. He bought 33 guns in the last year. The man with no ears shot up the Texas Church killing 26 people. Adam Lanza “killed” 26 people at his school. Rand Paul was hit in his 33 on 11-3. It was reported it broke 5 ribs one day, updated to 6 ribs the next day. 11 ribs total. BROKEN RIBS = 113. David Rockefeller died with $3.3 billion. Rockefeller = 110 and his Twin Towers had 110 floors in the shape of a giant 11. They were blown up after 33 years. Mohammed ATTA was 33. The Special Forces Monument was paraded through 33 NYC streets on 11-11-11. The Twin Tower light show lasted 33 days. When Rockefeller died, his death broke a 110-day streak of no 1% declines in the S&P.

    Markets are rigged. Sports are rigged. News is rigged. That’s what we learn from baseball.

    • Curmudgeon
      Curmudgeon says:

      You are speaking of baseball as it exists today. Originally it was a recreational sport with much less complicated rules than cricket. Like every other sport, when big money becomes involved, the rules change to suit big money.

    • Charlie
      Charlie says:

      It was invented during the American Civil War and played literally in “bull pens”, stockyards. Hence why many of the terms seem oddly related to cattle and stockyards because they are. Jooz would never have created anything entertaining. They’re weak, pimply, greasy and lack any sort of physical attributes to play any sport. They focus on shekels and taking them away from others. They would have “invented” betting on baseball but not the game itself. That would require intellect and mostly jooz are just greedy, immoral, idiots.

  5. pterodactyl
    pterodactyl says:

    Africans are good at running but are useless at swimming, due to bone density, which is why they tend not to enter the swimming events in the Olympics – I assume as I never watch them.

  6. Another_Amalekite
    Another_Amalekite says:

    There are lessons to be learned from the game of baseball.

    Yes, there are.
    Lesson #1: Baseball is the most boring, talentless game in the universe.

    • Pierre de Craon
      Pierre de Craon says:

      Dear A_A,

      One needn’t share your tout court dyspeptic view of baseball to lament its contemporary degradation into a Tribal racket where steroidal balls and ludicrously short fences have made pop fly hitters into home run kings.

      Nevertheless, what seems to be your implication that going to baseball for life lessons of any sort is a journey wasted strikes me as very sound analysis. Once someone has noticed that baseball might be seen as a microcosm of the often vexed relationship of the individual and society, he has, I think, pretty much exhausted baseball’s capacity for useful instruction.

  7. Steve P.
    Steve P. says:

    I heard a sports talk host today say two non-sequiturs:
    1) That the only way for Miami Marlins to survive financially was to go all-Latino
    2) then he added: “like the Boston Celtics try to be the white team”. (I guess his info on the Celtics is a little bit dated?).

Comments are closed.