Author Archives: Robert S. Griffin

Critical Theory in the American University: A Critical Issue, Part Three

Read Parts One and Two before proceeding here.   It is remarkable how universal a negative, critical, view of Whites as a race is in today’s university.  Every course, every speaker, every professional article and book, every “welcome week” activity in the fall, every program in the dorms, every word uttered in faculty meetings, every […]

Critical Theory in the American University: A Critical Issue, Part Two

This material depends on familiarity with  Part One. Please read that before proceeding here. David Roediger is a White professor of African American studies at the University of Illinois. He is a leading voice in the White abolitionist movement, as it is called: “It is not merely that whiteness is oppressive and false,” he asserts, […]

Critical Theory in the American University: A Critical Issue, Part One

I teach a university course in education taken by undergraduate liberal arts students—they aren’t education majors—who take the course as an elective. It focuses on contemporary elementary and secondary public schooling and, to a lesser extent, the circumstance in universities.  Among the required readings this semester (Fall, 2013) are sections of a book edited by […]

Are Whites Pathological? Yes and No: Part 2

Go to Part One. Part one of this writing examined the status of White people from an individualistic, in contrast to an aggregate, perspective.  Part two explores the implications of that analysis and depends on the reader’s familiarity with the material in part one. White analysis, advocacy, and action need to be grounded in the […]

Are Whites Pathological? Yes and No: Part 1

Kevin MacDonald recently noted,  “Whatever blame for our situation that we [Whites] place on others, the bottom line is that we are allowing the unfolding disaster to happen.  It is unprecedented for a civilization to voluntarily cede political and cultural hegemony to others, particularly when so many of these people harbor hatreds and resentments toward […]

Learning from Birdman

I teach a course on sport in society in a university, which has brought me close to the culture of sport, its values, its ways.   Examining the workings of the sports realm has helped me acquire what could be termed an anthropological, or sociological, perspective on how the rest of American life goes about its […]

What Louis Michael Seidman Made Me Think About

An opinion piece in the December 30th New York Times by Louis Michael Seidman, a professor of constitutional law, caught my eye.  Seidman, or the Times’ headline writer, entitled it “Let’s Give Up on the Constitution. This quote will convey a sense of its direction:  As the nation teeters at the edge of fiscal chaos, […]