Entries by Greg Johnson

Review of Paul Gottfried’s “Leo Strauss and the Conservative Movement in America,” Part 2

Part 1. 2. The “Lockean Founding” of the United States Gottfried is apparently attracted to the anti-rationalist Burkean tradition of conservatism, which in effect claims that history is smarter than reason, therefore, we should take our guidance from historically evolved institutions and conventions rather than rational constructs. This form of conservatism is, of course, dismissed […]

Review of Paul Gottfried’s “Leo Strauss and the Conservative Movement in America,” Part 1

Paul Edward Gottfried Leo Strauss and the Conservative Movement in America: A Critical Appraisal New York: Cambridge University Press, 2012 Paul Gottfried’s admirable book on Leo Strauss is an unusual and welcome critique from the Right. Leo Strauss (1899–1973) was a German-born Jewish political theorist who moved to the United States in 1937. Strauss taught […]

Smells Like White Guilt: Christian Lander’s Whiter Shades of Pale

Christian Lander: Whiter Shades of Pale: The Stuff White People Like, Coast to Coast, from Seattle’s Sweaters to Maine’s Microbrews; New York: Random House, 2010 I saw Christian Lander in San Francisco on Tuesday, December 2nd, speaking to a tiny sweater-clad audience at a small independent bookstore in the Marina District. Lander told the story of […]

Implicit Whiteness and the Republicans

Kevin MacDonald’s work on the concept of “implicit whiteness” in his essay “Psychology and White Ethnocentrism” (acacdemic version) is a major breakthrough for White Nationalism. Ethnocentrism—usually stigmatized as “xenophobia” and “racism”— is a preference to be around genetically similar people. Anti-ethnocentrism—a preference for people unlike ourselves—is sold today as “diversity,” the secret ingredient that adds […]

Is Racial Purism Decadent?

“Those who talk too much about race no longer have it in them.” —Oswald Spengler Recently I spent a good deal of time re-reading the great Oswald Spengler: for general enlightenment, but also with an eye to criticizing his teachings about race, which seemed at first reading confused, bizarre, and dangerous. Much to my surprise, […]