Church Burning and Jewish Settlers in Israel

Enza Ferreri


 

Israel’s unfair treatment of Christians continues. At the end of June, Israeli Occupation Forces (IOF) arrested Greek Orthodox Bishop Atallah Hanna during his peaceful participation in a march protesting the illegal seizure and subsequent sale of Beit al-Baraka hospital, which is part of al-Baraka church, north of Hebron.

A few days ago Palestine News Network reported:

A delegation from the Presbyterian church as well as international and Israeli activists participated in the march against the sale of Beit al-Baraka, a hospital which provided medical services to Palestinians as part of al-Baraka church services. The sale is illegal under international and canonical law. …

Israeli newspaper Haaretz last month leaked details of the seizure of Beit al-Baraka hospital by a Jewish billionaire, the sale having been allegedly made through a fake Norwegian real estate company. Days after publication of this illegal seizure, the sale process halted, however Israeli Defense Minister, Moshe Ya’alon, subsequently decided that there was no legal impediment to the sale of the building.

The previous week saw one of the most serious episodes of violence in recent memory against Christians in Israel. Five teams of firefighters were necessary to put out the flames which at dawn woke up Tabgha, the area on the shores of the Sea of Galilee, in northern Israel, where Jesus fed the 5,000 with the miracle of the multiplication of the loaves and fishes (Mark 6:30–46) and where Jesus appeared for the fourth time after his resurrection following his Crucifixion (John 21:1–24). Read more »


Observations - The Occidental Observer Blog
Greville Janner goes to court

The decision to prosecute former President of the British Board of Jewish Deputies Greville Janner on 22 charges of historic child abuse means a long hot summer is ahead in London. The surprise new twist comes after an independent QC — senior lawyer — reviewed the case and said that a prosecution go could ahead.

It was a much criticised previous ruling by the government’s chief law officer, that Janner was too ill with Alzheimer’s to be tried, that set off a firestorm of controversy. The law officer’s decision was baffling when it was revealed there were adequate procedures for trying such defendants and they were used quite frequently.

The Occidental Observer amongst others had shown how his senility had not prevented him attending House of Lords debates and speaking or drawing hundreds of thousands of expenses.

But TOO has been the only media outlet to dare to ask whether it was Janner’s position as a leading Jewish politician at the nexus of the relationship between British politics and Jewish power in Britain that protected him. Read more »