British Politics

Working-Class Zero: The Political Autism of Alan Moore and His Labour Party Friends, Part 2

Go to Part 1.

Resolute enemies of the working-class

Does Jeremy Corbyn intend to listen to working-class concerns and reverse New Labour’s policies on immigration? Not in the slightest. And give him his due: in his recent speech to the Labour Party Conference, he was completely open about Labour’s intentions. He said that a Labour government would “provide extra funding to communities that have the largest rises in population,” and he refused to make “false promises” about reducing immigration, let alone ending or reversing it.

In other words, open borders will continue if he wins a general election. Under Corbyn, the Labour party remains “hostile to the English working class.” To underline the point, Corbyn has appointed three resolute enemies of the White working class to senior positions in his shadow cabinet. The Black supremacist Diane Abbott has become Shadow Home Secretary and the rich Hindu lawyer Shami Chakrabarti has become Shadow Attorney General. They join the rich feminist lawyer Emily Thornberry, who was already Shadow Foreign Secretary.

diane-abbott

Diane Abbott

Abbott has repeatedly demonstrated her hostility to Whites during her time in parliament (but was happy for her son to have an expensive private education among them). Thornberry has publicly sneered at “White Van Man,” a symbol of the working-class builders, plumbers and electricians whose incomes have been badly harmed by cheap labour from Eastern Europe. Anxious not to be left out, Chakrabarti has publicly sneered at “Essex Man,” another symbol of the White working-class.

The views of Jews

Chakrabarti  was speaking to a Jewish audience at the Labour party conference, begging them not to abandon the party: “Please don’t go. Don’t leave me here, don’t leave me locked in a room with Essex man. … I don’t want to be left alone with people who lack the vision and views that you and I bring to this party as members of minority groups.” Chakrabarti’s minority supremacism and hostility to the White working class will cause her no problems in Corbyn’s Labour party.

Quite the reverse. But “anti-Semitism” is allegedly a serious problem in Labour. Corbyn denounced it in his conference speech and Chakrabarti recently wrote an “independent” report discussing its manifestations in the party. She concluded it wasn’t a serious problem and was accused of overseeing a “whitewash” by her Jewish critics. In fact, the report was a “brownwash”: anti-Semitism in Labour, as elsewhere in Britain, has increased because of Muslims, who somehow fail to see Jews as “natural allies,” despite the best efforts of anti-White Jewish activists like Jonathan Freedland and Dr Richard Stone. Read more

Working-Class Zero: The Political Autism of Alan Moore and His Labour Party Friends, Part 1

alan-moore1

Alan Moore

Genius. It’s an over-worked term in modern popular culture, quickly bestowed on any musician, artist or writer who becomes famous or influential. But there are people for whom it seems appropriate. The British writer Alan Moore is one of them. In his prime, this proud son of Northampton bestrode the world of comics like a colossus, imagineering, innovating and inspiring like a combination of Hieronymus Bosch, H.P. Lovecraft and William Burroughs. He was, and remains, a master of both words and images, synergizing the verbal and the visual to create worlds of wonder for his millions of awestruck fans.

Alan Moore is a genius. It doesn’t sound wrong to say that.

Goodthinkful liberals

At least, it doesn’t sound wrong if you are one of those many fans. But I’ve never felt the Moore magic myself. I’ve tried masterpieces of his like Watchmen (1987) and V for Vendetta (1985) and found them over-written, pretentious and confused. And I thought this long before I became a crazed political extremist. When I first read Watchmen I was a goodthinkful liberal too, resolutely opposed to racism, sexism and homophobia.

That was then. Now I reject Moore not just as a writer but as a thinker too. His art is adolescent and so are his politics. Like the Yorkshire playwright Alan Bennett, he makes much of his humble origins and the simplicity and decency of his working-class parents. And like Bennett, he unflinchingly supports all the forces in British politics and culture that most despise the working class and people like his parents.

On the upside, those same forces will shower riches on any talented working-class writer who demonstrates his goodthinkfulness and collaborates with them in their anti-prole endeavours. As I pointed out in “Bend It Like Bennett,” Alan Bennett is a rich man who was well able to afford a wallet-lightening encounter with some vibrant Romanian Gypsies. Alan Moore is also rich: he has recently donated £10,000 to help a friend bring his “African wife” over from Mozambique. The British government were asking the friend to prove that he had the “minimum income threshold” required to support a foreign wife.

Moore thought there was “some unpleasant racial issue” in his friend’s difficulties, concluded that “racism” was at work, and expressed his “continuing incredulous disgust over the manner in which Mr Cousins and his wife Paula have been kept separate for what is now a period of years.”

In short, Moore was virtue-signalling, secure in the knowledge that his donation and the opinions that accompanied it would bring him nothing but approval and admiration from his fellow liberals. Read more

How the manufactured anti-Semitism crisis is destroying UK Labour

“I can’t believe that!” said Alice.

“Can’t you?” the Queen said in a pitying tone. “Try again: draw a long breath, and shut your eyes.”

Alice laughed. “There’s no use trying,” she said: “one can’t believe impossible things.”

“I daresay you haven’t had much practice,” said the Queen. “When I was your age, I always did it for half-an-hour a day. Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.” – Alice through the Looking Glass by Lewis Carroll

Lewis Carroll took us on journey through a fantasy land where nothing was what it seemed and which could only be understood through the eyes of a child. It would take a similarly powerful imagination to make sense of the turmoil unfolding in Britain’s Labour Party.

In order to comprehend the civil war in one of the West’s oldest centre-left parties you have to know two things that must never be openly admitted.  The first is that the entire row has been over an anti-Semitism crisis that was clearly manufactured.

The second point is that the real reason for the dispute; the party’s future as a vehicle for Jewish political power in Britain and reliable friend of Israel, must never be openly discussed at all.  Read more

The Irrepressibility of Ethnopolitics and the Death of the Labour Party

Newton’s third law of motion is, “For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.” Sometimes this applies to politics as well as physics, as we see with the present perilous state of the Labour Party, which has been reacting to its previous co-option by globalists and metropolitan elites, by going in the opposite direction towards a politically naïve grass-roots upsurge, combined with strong hints of counter-Semitic sentiment.

This is the true story behind the surprising rise of Jeremy Corbyn, who has now been re-elected leader with an increased majority over his oily and unlikable challenger Owen Smith. (Yes, the Labour Party seems to have an unfortunate oversupply of charisma-deficient beta types who inevitably end up contesting these make-or-break leadership contests.)

The Labour Party has long faced the same dilemma as America’s Democrat Party, namely an egalitarian ethos that empowers those whose stake in the party is pure enthusiasm over those who have a more substantial and financial stake in the party — the party elites — while also marginalizing the interests and opinions of the voter base.

Because of the threat to electability that this presents, the Democrats came up with their “super delegate” system, a way for the corrupt, pragmatic, and power hungry centrists at the top to retain control, something they pulled off with little difficulty in the case of the Bernie insurgency. Read more

Theresa May — Friend of Israel and the Organized Jewish Community

Anyone wondering about the priorities of Mrs Theresa May should follow her actions from the moment she learned she was to become Britain’s next Prime Minister.
Her first act was to sign a pledge committing her to remember the Holocaust and “stand up to hatred and intolerance”. And her second  was to spend the evening before her confirmation by the Queen at a private dinner at the home of Chief Rabbi Ephraim Mirvis.
Whatever else awaits the British people, they can be under no doubt that their new leader is once again a true Friend of Israel.

In a parliamentary career marked by cowardice and a tendency to go along with whichever political wind is blowing, it is hard to say which has been Mrs Theresa May’s most inglorious moment.  Was it her decision, as Home Secretary, to throw open Britain’s borders and allow immigration to arise to record levels — after being elected specifically on a promise to reduce it?  Perhaps it was her plans to target “non-violent extremists” via blacklists, internet free-speech restrictions and movement bans?

For many nationalists, the most egregious moment in this wretched woman’s career came in a speech she gave at the Finchley United Synagogue in April 2015 when she defiled the memory of British servicemen killed in Palestine 1939 — 1948 by praising, instead, their Jewish terrorist killers.

So as today we celebrate the independence of the state of Israel and pay our respects to those who have fought so hard for it…. We remember the sacrifice of those who fought to achieve and protect that independence….

Thus the woman about to become the British Prime Minister tarnished the sacrifice of an estimated 784 British servicemen, police and crown officers killed in what is — for the Friends of Israel — one of the most embarrassing episodes in British colonial history (see Note below). She did not even have the decency to deliver this stab in the back behind closed doors. Read more

Brexit — the shockwaves continue: UKIP rising as Labour heads toward oblivion, Israel Lobby emerges triumphant

Has Britain’s referendum victory been stolen?  The forces of darkness have quickly reasserted themselves and the portents are now very grave.  Both the outgoing prime minister David Cameron and his possible successor Boris Johnson are both now saying trade must come before immigration curbs.  Nigel Farage, the face of Brexit, has accused them of backsliding but may himself have been already “frozen out” out of the European exit negotiations by more establishment figures in the broad Brexit alliance.

This would only confirmed the growing suspicions about the real motives behind the Conservatives who had so belatedly joined the Leave camp. Boris Johnson was worryingly vague about any change of European freedom of movement rules saying “It is said that those who voted Leave were mainly driven by anxieties about immigration. I do not believe that is so.” If there is a stab in the back then it is an inside job.

But it is the statements made by two prominent UKIP members, two prominent Leave members, one UKIP one Conservative, that have really caused alarm.  Both Douglas Carswell and Dan Hannan are still committed to freedom of movement across Europe which essentially negates the entire point of the referendum in the minds of most voters.

Both Carswell, who is an MP, and Hannan, who is an MEP,  are prominent conservative writers with strong free market affiliations and City of London connections.

But in fact both men have been sniping at Farage and questioning his leadership long before the referendum. At the height of the campaign Carswell was pouring abuse on his party leader, not least for a gritty refugee poster, and he then went to opine that Farage was “not a serious person.”

The Offensive Ad

The offensive poster

But while both men are disloyal to Nigel Farage and worryingly “flexible” on the core issue of immigration, there are some causes to which they do display unquestioned loyalty. Both are staunch friends of Israel and have gone out of their way to reassure the Jewish community that, whatever happens, they do not need to worry.

Read more

The Future of British Nationalism After Brexit

Brexit-Grexit-EU-Cartoon

Brexit has come and gone, and like Wellington said of the Battle of Waterloo it was a “damn close run thing.” Indeed, that was one of the reasons I supported Scottish independence two years ago — to stop Scotland dragging England to the left on important issues like this. (My other reason was so that Scotland could discover on its own — and rather painfully I suspect — the limits of leftism when not buttressed by a larger non-socialist entity).

But what about the fallout from Brexit and its effect on British nationalism? Yes, it gets us out of the EU and shakes the foundations of the still incomplete Tower of Babel. But what lessons can we learn from it, and what directions should nationalists take?

Perhaps the most interesting point about the Brexit Referendum is the political vacuum it revealed. All the main parties, except UKIP, officially backed the defeated cause. That’s right — the Conservative Party, Labour Party, and Lib Dems, as well as the SNP and Plaid Cymru, supported REMAIN. But, even with a higher turnout than in a general election, they failed to get their way.

What does this mean? It means that practically the entire British political establishment was not aligned with the wishes of the majority of the British voting public. Read more